Monthly Archives: April 2010

Good bye old friend, the playlist and AP comes to its senses and much more

As a kid, I loved an old film strip I once saw of some guy strapped up in a rocket sled that was then blasted down a track at astronomical speed.  The film cut to a close up of his face unshielded by helmet or windscreen.  The skin on his face rippled back in waves from the continuous blast of air rushing past him as he accelerated towards new knowledge and a wonderment at what the hell he had gotten himself into.

I loved it until I grew up and my professional life took on uncomfortable parallels with the rocket sled guy.  That’s one reason I’ve been social-media lite in recent weeks; the keyboard shakes uncontrollably when sled chatters down the track in excess of Mach 1.

But a big factor in my only sporadic presence when it comes to blogging, Facebook, LinkedIn, Photooba, etc., has been the demise of my beloved Titanium Powerbook G4.  I bought it in 2001 when I was starting a PR agency at my kitchen counter, and it has served me faithfully ever since.  In recent years, it has semi-retired to a place next to my La-Z-Boy recliner.  There it helped give voice to every bad joke and crack-brained theory I wanted to maunder on about.  And now it’s gone.  Au revoir, ami.

So for this brief return to help me blow out the cobwebs, here’s a Coalitionist’s Saturday night playlist (with apologies to Tony) and sensible news from Associated Press.  Enjoy!

Saturday night playlist for Coalitionists

  • Let’s Stay Together, Al Green, Al Green: Greatest Hits
  • Come Together, The Beatles, Abbey Road
  • All Together Now, The Beatles, Yellow Submarine
  • We Gotta Live Together (Live at the Fillmore East), Jimi Hendrix, Live at the Fillmore East
  • Together, The Raconteurs, Broken Boy Soldiers
  • Let’s Be Together (Demo Version), Sly and the Family Stone, Who In the Funk Do You Think You Are: The Warner Bros. Recordings
  • Happy Together, The Turtles, 20 Greatest Hits Rock
  • Hope That We Can Be Together Soon [with Sharon Paige], Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes Featuring Sharon Paige, Love Train • The Sound Of Philadelphia

And the AP sees the light!

AP changes its style on website, related words

By Therese Bottomly, The Oregonian

April 17, 2010, 11:45AM

A change of style from The Associated Press, which The Oregonian largely follows in matters of usage:

The Associated Press announced it is changing its style on Web site to website to reflect increasingly common usage. It is effective at 3 a.m. EDT Saturday, April 16.

A new entry on website has been added to the AP Stylebook Online and will be included in the updated text version, the 2010 AP Stylebook, which will be published next month.

The entry says:

website: A location on the World Wide Web that maintains one or more pages at a specific address. Also, webcam, webcast andwebmaster. But as a short form and in terms with separate words,the Web, Web page and Web feed.

What the “Superstar Effect” may mean for stakeholder engagement

There’s an interesting piece below from the Frontal Cortex about how “superstars” can depress – rather than inspire – performance among those around them.

The question for coalitionists is whether this may also apply to the task, advisory or working groups that we often use to study issues, develop solutions or build consensus.

There’s always a lot of discussion in engagement efforts regarding group composition to get a balance of interests, experience or willingness to participate.

But seldom, if ever, is there a discussion as to whether high-quality participants – stakeholder superstars – may in effect suppress the quality of thought/participation by others.

If the “Tiger Woods effect” is universal, perhaps we need to add another filter layer as we construct our engagement groups, one that attempts to group people of comparable levels of ability, if we want to maximize participation and creativity.

The Superstar Effect: ”

I’ve got a new essay in the WSJ about Tiger Woods, the hazards of playing against a superstar, and why we choke in high-pressure situations. The subplot of the piece is the positive feedback loop of success, or why winning in the past makes us more likely to win in the future. Every underdog, it turns out, has to rage against the natural insecurities of the mind (take note, Butler):

Competitors playing a match against Bobby Fischer, perhaps the greatest chess player of all time, often came down with a mysterious affliction known as ‘Fischer-fear.’ Even fellow grandmasters were vulnerable to the effect, which could manifest itself as flu-like symptoms, migraines and spiking blood pressure. As Boris Spassky, Mr. Fischer’s greatest rival, once said: ‘When you play Bobby, it is not a question of whether you win or lose. It is a question of whether you survive.’

Recent research on what is known as the superstar effect demonstrates that such mental collapses aren’t limited to chess. While challenging competitions are supposed to bring out our best, these studies demonstrate that when people are forced to compete against a peer who seems far superior, they often don’t rise to the challenge. Instead, they give up.

The negative effect of superstars has been most clearly demonstrated in professional golf, which for the last decade has been dominated by Tiger Woods. Next week, Mr. Woods ends his self-imposed exile from the game and returns to the PGA Tour at the Masters Tournament, in Augusta, Ga. It will be his first competition since November, when he won the JBWere Masters in Australia.

According to a paper by Jennifer Brown, an applied macroeconomist at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, Mr. Woods is such a dominating golfer that his presence in a tournament can make everyone else play significantly worse. Because his competitors expect him to win, they end up losing; success becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.

Ms. Brown argues that the superstar effect is not just relevant on the golf course. Instead, she suggests that the presence of superstars can be ‘de-motivating’ in a wide variety of competitions, from the sales office to the law firm. ‘Most people assume that competing against an elite performer makes everyone else step up their game and perform better,’ Ms. Brown says. ‘But the Tiger Woods data demonstrate that the opposite can also occur. It doesn’t matter if the superstar is an athlete or a corporate vice president. After all, why should we invest a lot of energy in a tournament that we’re probably going to lose?’

Ms. Brown discovered the superstar effect by analyzing data from every player in every PGA Tour event from 1999 to 2006. She chose golf for several reasons, from the lack of ‘confounding team dynamics’ to the immaculate statistics kept by the PGA. Most important, however, was the presence of Mr. Woods, who has dominated his sport in a way few others have.

The numbers back up the legend: When Mr. Woods’s break from golf began, in November, he had a World Golf Ranking score of 16.169, which was nearly twice the total of the next two players. He has more career major wins than any other active golfer, and has been awarded PGA Player of the Year a record 10 times.

Such domination appears to be deeply intimidating. Whenever Mr. Woods entered a tournament, every other golfer took, on average, 0.8 more strokes. This effect was even observable in the first round, with the presence of Mr. Woods leading to an additional 0.3 strokes among all golfers over the initial 18 holes. While this might sound like an insignificant difference, the average margin between first and second place in PGA Tour events is frequently just a single stroke. Interestingly, the superstar effect also varied depending on the player’s position on the leaderboard, with players closer to the lead showing a greater drop-off in performance. Based on this data, Ms. Brown calculated that the ‘superstar effect’ boosted Mr. Woods’s PGA earnings by nearly $5 million.

The analysis is really an investigation into economic tournament theory, which looks at competitive situations in which success is based on relative performance, and not absolute metrics. (It’s the difference between a sports game and a standardized test.) Modern management practice assumes that the best way to maximize employee performance is to institute sports-like tournaments, in which people compete directly against each other. Consider, for instance, the competitive structure put in place by former CEO Jack Welch at General Electric. He instituted what became known as the 20-70-10 rule: the top 20% of employees got generous financial bonuses, and the bottom 10% were ‘managed out.’

There is little doubt that, in many situations, such incentive structures lead to motivated employees, working hard for the top spots. But the presence of a superstar can reverse this dynamic, so that instead of trying our best we accept the inevitability of defeat.

According to Ms. Brown, the superstar effect is especially pronounced when the rewards for the competition are ‘nonlinear,’ or there is an extra incentive to finish first. (We assume that the superstar will win, so why chase after meaningless scraps?) Just look at golf: Not only does the tournament winner get a disproportionate amount of prize money, but he or she also gets all the glory.

Ms. Brown cites the competition among newly hired associates at a law firm as another example of a nonlinear incentive structure. ‘The lawyers know that most of them won’t be retained,’ she says. ‘They either win the competition, or they’re let go.’ The problem with such competitions is that when a superstar is present–when one of the legal associates is perceived as the clear favorite–every other lawyer is less likely to exert maximum effort. Because we assume we’re going to lose, we decide to cut our losses, which leads to an overall decrease in employee effort. The cutthroat competition made people less competitive.

Here’s the link for more.

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(Via The Frontal Cortex.)