Tag Archives: Resources

40 days and 40 nights

It’s only 40 days until I run my first official half-marathon – Waddell & Reed on Oct. 15. But I ran the 13-mile distance for the first time unofficially yesterday. 

I jumped ahead of my training schedule, prompted by driving the W&R route last week to get a sense of it.  I was left anxious by the experience and, rather than stew about it, I just went ahead and jumped from 11 miles to 13 miles distance to get it out of the way.  

It certainly makes me feel a little more confident that I can finish the W&R in October, bringing me one step closer to the colorful chaos that is the running with the bulls in Pamplona (see earlier posts for the tortured explanations of how they’re linked).  

 

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Ignore the bull behind you and think of Spain

How do you sell others, let alone yourself, on going to Pamplona?

One approach is to focus on the things that are easier to understand – the beauty of Spain, for example, charm of Pamplona itself or the vibrant, colorful experience of the Festival of San Fermin.

The cost of emotionally investing in the fun and pageantry is so much lower than investing in the possibility of death or dismemberment, and it makes it so much likelier that you, friends and family may actually be in Pamplona in July 2012.

How to: Mashable offers social media policies from 80+ organizations

Everybody I know who is in a corporate or government agency position responsible for coalition or network building has had the same horrible experience.

You’re trying to do something simple (like communicate with employees, allies or others in a social media space they occupy) and – Bam! – you discover you can’t do it with out IT/HR/Matlock tracking you down and beating you with the Intertubes.

In those situations, it often helps to counter-argue using the policies and practices of your clients, audiences or peer organizations. I don’t know about you, but to make inroads in my own company, I’m ridden the IBM social media policy pony until it is sway-backed.

So it was heartening to find this bundle of social media examples with which to fight the good fight for me, my group and my clients’ projects. Hope it helps you, too.

Social Media Policies from 80+ Organizations: “

contract

One of the key challenges for modern organizations is to define a social media policy. What’s acceptable? What isn’t? And how should you go about creating such a document for your workplace?

We’ve tried to aid with this process at Mashable through articles such as Should Your Company Have a Social Media Policy? and 10 Must-Haves for Your Social Media Policy. We’ve also published guides like Social Media for Business: The Dos & Don’ts of Sharing.

What’s more, we’ve looked at what happens when these guidelines go to far, like the controversy over the Associated Press social media policy, and a similar situation at the NFL.

If you’re looking to define your own social media guidelines, however, one worthwhile task is to read the policies of other organizations. Chris Boudreaux, author of the upcoming book ‘Social Media Governance’, has assembled 82 such policies on the book’s website. From companies to charities to military organizations, it’s a treasure trove for those struggling with social media guidelines.

We think it’s super-handy: we hope you’ll agree.

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, Richphotographics, Palto, rtiom


Reviews: Mashable, iStockphoto

Tags: social media


(Via Mashable!.)

How To: Mashable’s Twitter Guide Book Now Available for Download

Mashable’s Twitter Guide Book Now Available for Download:

twitterguidebookWe recently launched The Twitter Guide Book, a one-stop shop for getting up to speed with everything Twitter, from managing your Twitter stream to promoting a business. Now, we’ve packaged up all of our best Twitter resources in a downloadable presentation so you can flip through all of the content in one place, and print and share it with your friends and colleagues.

Presented by Adobe Acrobat 9, sponsor of this year’s SlideShare ‘World’s Best Presentation Contest’, the Twitter Guide Book includes a special audio introduction from Mashable Founder and CEO Pete Cashmore, as well as five chapters:

1. Twitter 101: The Basics
2. Building Your Twitter Community
3. Managing Your Twitter Stream
4. Sharing on Twitter
5. Twitter for Business

Please note that Acrobat 9 or Adobe Reader 9 is required for viewing. You can download Adobe Reader for free here. We’ve included some screenshots of the Guide Book below. You can view and download Mashable’s Twitter Guide Book here.

Twitter Guide Book home

Twitter Guide Book index image

twitter 101 image

sharing on twitter image


Supported by Adobe Acrobat 9, sponsor of this year’s SlideShare ‘World’s Best Presentation Contest


world's best presentation contest logoFrom August 3 to September 14, SlideShare is hosting its second annual ‘World’s Best Presentation Contest‘. Until early September, users of the world’s largest presentation sharing site will be able to use in-browser embedded sharing and view PDF portfolios with Adobe’s sponsorship. By providing SlideShare users with the opportunity to use cutting edge creation and sharing tools, these creative and business professionals can combine and distribute multimedia presentations in a way that’s never been done before.


Reviews: Twitter

Tags: download, downloadable, mashable, twitter, twitter guide book


(Via Mashable!.)

How To: Poynter Shares Ideas for How to Make Commenting Systems Work Better

Here’s an interesting conversation on how to add value to the comment sections of websites.

Commenting is going to grow in importance as more and more stakeholder engagement clients lose their squeamishness about unfettered public discussion of agencies and their actions.

And the truth of the matter is, it does takes pretty vigorous oversight and technology to manage out the dreck that sometimes overfills comment sections.

Ideas for How to Make Commenting Systems Work Better: “Many journalists complain that comment threads to their news stories represent the worst of online media. But it doesn’t have to be that way.”

(Via E-Media Tidbits.)

Without Comment: Business Insider Looks at How People Share Content Online

Business Insider Looks at How People Share Content Online:

A recent Business Insider ‘Chart of the Day‘ broke down the various ways that people share content on the Web.
Of those surveyed, 24 percent use Facebook as their primary content-sharing method. The ‘other’ category accounted for 11.4 percent, followed by e-mail (11.1 percent), and Twitter (10.8 percent).

Social media
BusinessInsider.com

Knowing how people use the Web to share information is important for news organizations as they experiment with new approaches to disseminating their content. It’s often difficult, however, for news organizations to accurately track the extent to which content-sharing sites drive people to their Web sites.

Search Engine Optimization guru Danny Sullivan (no relation) recently tracked Twitter transfer referrals and found that analytics programs sometimes under-report the numbers of referrals.

Sullivan reported:

‘Based only on referrers, at best, Google or any analytics program would have said Twitter sent two visits. But because I used tracking codes, I was able to overcome the lack of referring data and see that Twitter (itself or via applications or web sites using Twitter data) sent nine visits. That means analytics packages might be undercounting Twitter visits by nearly 500 percent.

‘Meanwhile, Bit.ly was showing those 58 clicks to the page. Let’s say it wasn’t filtering out some of the robots. I can still see that there are 32 visits that the log files recorded, all with the tracking codes that never existed until I tweeted the link with them. So those are all Twitter-derived visits. That means an undercount by a standard analytics tool depending on referrer data by 1600 percent.’

Given that Twitter is high up on the list of content-sharing sites, it helps to keep these findings in mind.

(Via E-Media Tidbits.)

How to: Mashable’s “Twitter for Beginners: 5 Steps for Better Tweeting”

Twitter for Beginners: 5 Steps for Better Tweeting:

Twitter is immensely useful as a utility for joining in the global conversation and sharing thoughts, opinions, information, and media. But for new users, there’s also a fairly steep learning curve. For many people new to Twitter, the site doesn’t immediately ‘make sense’ and it can be a bit daunting. But there are things those users can do to make the service more useful from the get go.

Below are five steps for new users to take in order to make the Twitter experience more enjoyable from the beginning. New users have both third party services and built-in tools at their disposal to make Twitter work for them, and this post highlights some of the best.


STEP ONE: Find People You Already Know


I joined Twitter later than most early adopters, but once I finally became a Twitter newbie in early 2008, it was much easier to jump into the conversation when I was following some people I already knew — people who I was sure were already talking about things I was interested in and would value my input.

The best tool available for new users directly on Twitter is the Find Friends on Other Networks tool, which lets people allow Twitter to scan their AOL, Yahoo!, or Gmail address books and see if anyone they know is on Twitter. Once you’ve synced your address book, Twitter will locate and suggest users to follow that you likely already know outside of Twitter. When you follow those friends, they’ll get an alert message saying that you’ve followed them.

findpeople

New users can also turn to third party Twitter people search engines like Tweepz, which take things up a notch by offering more detailed and easily scannable search results than Twitter’s own built in people search. Also check out our recent Twitter people search round up.

Another way to find friends is to check out the Twitter Facebook app and see if any of your friends on Facebook are also on Twitter. Of course, not every Facebook user that uses Twitter also has that application installed — the app has just 250,000 monthly active users, so the number of friends you find via this method might not be too many.


STEP TWO: Find Like-minded Users


One of the most clearly beneficial things for new users to do is to find other Twitterers that talk about the topics they’re interested in. Getting fed a stream of tweets on topics you actually care about will go a long way toward making Twitter more useful and interesting, right off the bat. One tool new Twitterers can use to find like-minded users is Twitter Search. Twitter’s own built-in search engine lets users search for others who are talking about the things they’re interested in by searching for keywords. However, it’s also a bit of a slapdash method of finding users to follow. Because the search is real-time, you’ll only ever find the users who were most recently talking about a specific subject, not necessarily those who talk about it regularly.

twellow

Fortunately, there are some third party services that new users can turn to in order to find other like-minded users to follow. Twitter directories Twellow and WeFollow organize Twitter users based on topic, and are great places to find other users who will regularly tweet about things you’re interested in.

You should also look into third party sites like Twubble and Twitterel, which attempt to give people friend suggestions on Twitter, based on the friends of your friends and the things you’re interested in.


STEP THREE: Find People in the Area


When I first started using Twitter, I used it for a couple of months, then got bored with it and stopped using it for a while. Recently, I have begun to follow a lot more people in my local area, and I’ve noticed that the service has become much more useful. I get updates about local meetups, stay abreast of local issues, and am able to connect with people around things that only those in my city would understand.

twellowhood

I would have loved to have known how to find local users to follow when I first began using Twitter — I may never have taken a hiatus from the service if I had. A good place to start your search for local tweeters is Twitter search. By using the advanced search options, you can limit results to only those tweets originating from nearby to a specific location.

Of course, third party apps, such as TwellowHood and Localtweeps, generally offer better results. Be sure to check out our recent guide to finding local Twitter users.


STEP FOUR: Get a Desktop (or Mobile) Client


Once you really get into Twitter and start using it to have conversations with friends and followers, you’ll want to upgrade from the Twitter.com web interface. Using the web for tweeting becomes difficult when you start following a lot of people and doing things like sending and receiving replies and direct messages. But don’t worry, there is a solution: a desktop client.

Desktop clients are software built specifically to utilize Twitter. Clients for the desktop generally do very helpful things, like let you put the people you’re following into groups, so you can be sure you won’t miss a tweet from those you care about the most, alert you when you get a new direct message or @reply, search Twitter without having to visit a separate page, or help you share images or videos. In other words, they help you get the most out of Twitter and not miss anything important.

tweetdeck

Our current favorite desktop client is Tweetdeck, with Seesmic running a close second. Be sure to check out our round-up of 19 Twitter desktop clients, for the skinny on a large number of available options.

Mobile users can also download applications to help them get more out of Twitter, those users who tweet on an iPhone especially have plenty of options. There are some web-based Twitter clients available that make Twitter easier to use, as well, such as Mixero and PeopleBrowsr.

*Disclosure: TweetDeck partnered with Mashable to create MashDeck, a branded version of the software.


STEP FIVE: Learn the Ropes


Twitter can be very daunting for new users. It has its own set of jargon (#hashtags, @replies, retweets, direct messages, etc.), its own set of commands, confusing rules about who sees your tweets, and a sea of third party clients to navigate. That can be overwhelming for someone new to get into. One place to start learning about Twitter, is the site’s own help portal and Getting Started forum aimed at new users. They’re not the most user friendly sites, though, and might raise more questions than they answer for some users.

At Mashable we just recently launched our Twitter Guide Book, which attempts to help both new and experienced users learn how to use the service and get the most out of it. You should also check out Twitter app directory Twitdom, where you can learn about many of the cool things you can do with Twitter.

twitter-guide


Reviews: Facebook, Gmail, Mashable, Mixero, Seesmic, TweetDeck, Twellow, Twitdom, Twitter, WeFollow

Tags: Lists, localtweeps, mixero, peoplebrowsr, seesmic, tweeps, tweetdeck, twellow, twitter, Twitter Search, twitterel, twubble, wefollow


(Via Mashable!.)