Tag Archives: Twitter

Pew survey highlights/hides Twitter implications

There’s significant growth in the “use” of Twitter, according to the Pew Internet & American Life Project and its release of a new report on Twitter and similar sites.

In fact, Twitter use has nearly doubled, particularly among younger and mobile Internet users, according to the report, which also provides updated demographic information about who is using Twitter and other social media.

But it pays to follow the links to the entire report to uncover some “buried” nuggets, like the Harvard Business School report that suggests that 90 percent of all Twitter traffic is actually generated by onlt 10 percent of its users.

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Without Comment: 40% of Tweets Are Pointless Babble

TWITTER ANALYSIS: 40% of Tweets Are Pointless Babble: “

With Twitter being such a hot trend right now, research firms have been anxious to study how people are using the social platform, and analyze trends in aggregate view.

One such company, data analytics provider, Pear Analytics, set out to study the contents of our tweets to determine if, in fact, we’re all just sharing mindless babble, or if there was something more intellectual going on.

Their findings aren’t all that favorable to those of us with lofty views of Twitter, because as it turns out, 40.55% of tweets are pointless babble.

As somewhat of a redemption for our narcissistic oversharing ways, conversational tweets came in a very close second with 37.55%. Pass-along value — or RTs — captured third-place with only 8.7%, but, thankfully, spam only accounted for 3.75% of all tweets studied.

You can read about Pear Analytics’ research methodology in the full report (PDF download), but it appears as if they tried to capture sample data that would be reflective of the larger Twitter population.

(Via Mashable!.)

Many adults say they’re not sold on social networks

Something to consider as budget constraints and a preference for shiny spinning things puts more and more stakeholder engagement and coalition-building efforts on the Internets, thanks to USA Today:

Social-networking services such as Facebook, MySpace and Twitter may be generating lots of buzz. But old-fashioned, non-digital, face-to-face conversations aren’t out of vogue just yet.

About 87% of 1,000 adults questioned in June said they prefer to deal with other people in person instead of via computers or smartphones, according to a survey from Brightkite, a mobile social-networking service, and GfK Technology, a market research agency.

Women prefer face time 70 times more than using social networks. By contrast, men prefer it 33 times more, according to the survey.

What about tweeting on Twitter? Well, another survey shows that most people still consider that for the birds. Nearly 70% of 2,025 adults questioned in June said they didn’t know enough about Twitter to have an opinion about it, according to a LinkedIn Research Network/Harris Poll.

How To: Mashable’s Twitter Guide Book Now Available for Download

Mashable’s Twitter Guide Book Now Available for Download:

twitterguidebookWe recently launched The Twitter Guide Book, a one-stop shop for getting up to speed with everything Twitter, from managing your Twitter stream to promoting a business. Now, we’ve packaged up all of our best Twitter resources in a downloadable presentation so you can flip through all of the content in one place, and print and share it with your friends and colleagues.

Presented by Adobe Acrobat 9, sponsor of this year’s SlideShare ‘World’s Best Presentation Contest’, the Twitter Guide Book includes a special audio introduction from Mashable Founder and CEO Pete Cashmore, as well as five chapters:

1. Twitter 101: The Basics
2. Building Your Twitter Community
3. Managing Your Twitter Stream
4. Sharing on Twitter
5. Twitter for Business

Please note that Acrobat 9 or Adobe Reader 9 is required for viewing. You can download Adobe Reader for free here. We’ve included some screenshots of the Guide Book below. You can view and download Mashable’s Twitter Guide Book here.

Twitter Guide Book home

Twitter Guide Book index image

twitter 101 image

sharing on twitter image


Supported by Adobe Acrobat 9, sponsor of this year’s SlideShare ‘World’s Best Presentation Contest


world's best presentation contest logoFrom August 3 to September 14, SlideShare is hosting its second annual ‘World’s Best Presentation Contest‘. Until early September, users of the world’s largest presentation sharing site will be able to use in-browser embedded sharing and view PDF portfolios with Adobe’s sponsorship. By providing SlideShare users with the opportunity to use cutting edge creation and sharing tools, these creative and business professionals can combine and distribute multimedia presentations in a way that’s never been done before.


Reviews: Twitter

Tags: download, downloadable, mashable, twitter, twitter guide book


(Via Mashable!.)

Without Comment: Pew Findings on Adults & Social Networks

Pew Findings on Adults & Social Networks: At its core, use of online social networks is still a phenomenon of the young http://ow.ly/hOSK:

(Via PRSA Resource Center – FriendFeed.)

How to: Mashable’s “Twitter for Beginners: 5 Steps for Better Tweeting”

Twitter for Beginners: 5 Steps for Better Tweeting:

Twitter is immensely useful as a utility for joining in the global conversation and sharing thoughts, opinions, information, and media. But for new users, there’s also a fairly steep learning curve. For many people new to Twitter, the site doesn’t immediately ‘make sense’ and it can be a bit daunting. But there are things those users can do to make the service more useful from the get go.

Below are five steps for new users to take in order to make the Twitter experience more enjoyable from the beginning. New users have both third party services and built-in tools at their disposal to make Twitter work for them, and this post highlights some of the best.


STEP ONE: Find People You Already Know


I joined Twitter later than most early adopters, but once I finally became a Twitter newbie in early 2008, it was much easier to jump into the conversation when I was following some people I already knew — people who I was sure were already talking about things I was interested in and would value my input.

The best tool available for new users directly on Twitter is the Find Friends on Other Networks tool, which lets people allow Twitter to scan their AOL, Yahoo!, or Gmail address books and see if anyone they know is on Twitter. Once you’ve synced your address book, Twitter will locate and suggest users to follow that you likely already know outside of Twitter. When you follow those friends, they’ll get an alert message saying that you’ve followed them.

findpeople

New users can also turn to third party Twitter people search engines like Tweepz, which take things up a notch by offering more detailed and easily scannable search results than Twitter’s own built in people search. Also check out our recent Twitter people search round up.

Another way to find friends is to check out the Twitter Facebook app and see if any of your friends on Facebook are also on Twitter. Of course, not every Facebook user that uses Twitter also has that application installed — the app has just 250,000 monthly active users, so the number of friends you find via this method might not be too many.


STEP TWO: Find Like-minded Users


One of the most clearly beneficial things for new users to do is to find other Twitterers that talk about the topics they’re interested in. Getting fed a stream of tweets on topics you actually care about will go a long way toward making Twitter more useful and interesting, right off the bat. One tool new Twitterers can use to find like-minded users is Twitter Search. Twitter’s own built-in search engine lets users search for others who are talking about the things they’re interested in by searching for keywords. However, it’s also a bit of a slapdash method of finding users to follow. Because the search is real-time, you’ll only ever find the users who were most recently talking about a specific subject, not necessarily those who talk about it regularly.

twellow

Fortunately, there are some third party services that new users can turn to in order to find other like-minded users to follow. Twitter directories Twellow and WeFollow organize Twitter users based on topic, and are great places to find other users who will regularly tweet about things you’re interested in.

You should also look into third party sites like Twubble and Twitterel, which attempt to give people friend suggestions on Twitter, based on the friends of your friends and the things you’re interested in.


STEP THREE: Find People in the Area


When I first started using Twitter, I used it for a couple of months, then got bored with it and stopped using it for a while. Recently, I have begun to follow a lot more people in my local area, and I’ve noticed that the service has become much more useful. I get updates about local meetups, stay abreast of local issues, and am able to connect with people around things that only those in my city would understand.

twellowhood

I would have loved to have known how to find local users to follow when I first began using Twitter — I may never have taken a hiatus from the service if I had. A good place to start your search for local tweeters is Twitter search. By using the advanced search options, you can limit results to only those tweets originating from nearby to a specific location.

Of course, third party apps, such as TwellowHood and Localtweeps, generally offer better results. Be sure to check out our recent guide to finding local Twitter users.


STEP FOUR: Get a Desktop (or Mobile) Client


Once you really get into Twitter and start using it to have conversations with friends and followers, you’ll want to upgrade from the Twitter.com web interface. Using the web for tweeting becomes difficult when you start following a lot of people and doing things like sending and receiving replies and direct messages. But don’t worry, there is a solution: a desktop client.

Desktop clients are software built specifically to utilize Twitter. Clients for the desktop generally do very helpful things, like let you put the people you’re following into groups, so you can be sure you won’t miss a tweet from those you care about the most, alert you when you get a new direct message or @reply, search Twitter without having to visit a separate page, or help you share images or videos. In other words, they help you get the most out of Twitter and not miss anything important.

tweetdeck

Our current favorite desktop client is Tweetdeck, with Seesmic running a close second. Be sure to check out our round-up of 19 Twitter desktop clients, for the skinny on a large number of available options.

Mobile users can also download applications to help them get more out of Twitter, those users who tweet on an iPhone especially have plenty of options. There are some web-based Twitter clients available that make Twitter easier to use, as well, such as Mixero and PeopleBrowsr.

*Disclosure: TweetDeck partnered with Mashable to create MashDeck, a branded version of the software.


STEP FIVE: Learn the Ropes


Twitter can be very daunting for new users. It has its own set of jargon (#hashtags, @replies, retweets, direct messages, etc.), its own set of commands, confusing rules about who sees your tweets, and a sea of third party clients to navigate. That can be overwhelming for someone new to get into. One place to start learning about Twitter, is the site’s own help portal and Getting Started forum aimed at new users. They’re not the most user friendly sites, though, and might raise more questions than they answer for some users.

At Mashable we just recently launched our Twitter Guide Book, which attempts to help both new and experienced users learn how to use the service and get the most out of it. You should also check out Twitter app directory Twitdom, where you can learn about many of the cool things you can do with Twitter.

twitter-guide


Reviews: Facebook, Gmail, Mashable, Mixero, Seesmic, TweetDeck, Twellow, Twitdom, Twitter, WeFollow

Tags: Lists, localtweeps, mixero, peoplebrowsr, seesmic, tweeps, tweetdeck, twellow, twitter, Twitter Search, twitterel, twubble, wefollow


(Via Mashable!.)

Quick tip: Heads up on a new Twitter tool

From E-Media Tidbits:

“A new Twitter interface application, Twitterfall, has been around for a month now.  … this is a must-see — for about 10 minutes. Then it becomes a must-use.

Here’s what Twitterfall does:

  • Scanning. You can choose to watch everyone’s tweets go by, or log in to watch only the tweets of those you follow. Thanks to Comet technology, Twitterfall has an especially fast search service. You can alter the speed from 0.3 tweets per second to a mind-scrambling 10 tweets per second.
  • Keyword tracking. You can see the most popular terms of the moment, and just follow tweets containing those keywords (including hashtags). Or you can enter your own search term (as on the Web-based Twitter service Monitter) to track tweets mentioning it. You can combine keywords, too.
  • Geo-filtering. You can enter a location to narrow down your display to tweets from that location that also mention keywords you choose (again as with Monitter). The words Mumbai and Chengdu come to mind.
  • Basic usability. Unlike Monitter, you can use Twitterfall to post tweets yourself, reply to tweets and mark tweets as favorites. Just hovering over a tweet pauses the whole thing. You can also follow a user with one click — a feature some popular clients like Tweetdeck lack. You can filter by language and choose to exclude retweets. You can save favorite searches. And you can customize the appearance of the interface, including the font size.

This is quite simply the best-designed Twitter interface …”